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90-90-90 TARGET

…… an ambitious treatment target to end the AIDS epidemic by 2030.  According to UNAIDS, powerful momentum is now building towards a new narrative on HIV treatment and a new, final, ambitious, but achievable target.  It means that:

 

By 2020, 90% of all people living with HIV will know their HIV status.

 

By 2020, 90% of all people with diagnosed HIV infection will receive sustained antiretroviral therapy.

 

By 2020, 90% of all people receiving antiretroviral therapy will have viral suppression.

 

Partnership with People Living with HIV and Key Populations

Unique Aid Foundation believes that effective partnership with people living with HIV and key populations are critical to ending the AIDS epidemic.  We can’t win the war against AIDS in an environment where exclusion is the order of the day.  Everybody must be carried along irrespective of race, colour, ethnicity, sexual preferences, religious affiliation, etc.  Gay men and other men who have sex with men, sex workers, transgender people, people who inject drugs and prisoners and other incarcerated people, adolescent and young women are particularly vulnerable to HIV and frequently lack adequate access to healthcare services.  Let’s work together and prioritize key population in the AIDS response.

GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE AND HIV

Unique Aid Foundation says No to Gender-Based Violence.  Studies have shown that, in some regions, women who experienced physical or sexual intimate partner violence were 1.5 times more likely to acquire HIV.  Among women living with HIV, intimate partner violence can lead to lower antiretroviral therapy use and adherence to HIV treatment, and higher viral loads. As we works towards ending AIDS in 2030, society must rise up against GBV.

THE GIPA PRINCIPLE

Unique Aid Foundation  respond to the issue of GIPA by empowering  people living with HIV and key populations to  overcome self-stigma, give human face and voice to HIV and demand for meaning involvement in decision making process that impact their lives.   GIPA is about “meaningful involvement,” not tokenistic participation and care and support.

 

The idea that personal experiences should shape the AIDS response was first voiced by people living with HIV in Denver in 1983.  The GIPA Principle was formalized at the 1994 Paris AIDS Summit when 42 countries agreed to “support a greater involvement of people living with HIV at all levels to stimulate the creation of supportive political, legal and social environment.   The engagement of people living with HIV is all the more urgent as countries scale up their national AIDS responses to achieve the goal of universal access to prevention, treatment, care and support services and ultimately the 90-90-90 vision.  Let’s work together to end AIDS!

 

GIPA does not require disclosing one’s HIV status to the public. It does not mean “no visibility = no involvement.” GIPA seeks to ensure that people living with HIV are equal partners and breaks down simplistic (and false) assumptions of “service  providers” (as those living without HIV) and “service receivers” (as those living with HIV). It is a principle that aims to realize the rights and responsibilities of people living with HIV, including their right to self-determination and participation in decision-making processes that impact their lives. In these efforts, GIPA also aims to enhance the quality and effectiveness of the AIDS response.

 

RESPECT FOR FUNDAMENTAL RIGHTS

Unique Aid Foundation says no to all barriers to effective HIV responses, including stigma and discrimination, inequality and violence against women and girls, denial of sexual and reproductive health and rights, misuse of criminal law and punitive approaches and mandatory testing for HIV. These challenges particularly affect people living with HIV and key populations.  Let’s work now to overcome legal, human rights and gender-related barriers to health services, while affirming the dignity of people living with HIV, or vulnerable to HIV using a rights-based approach. 

 

YOUNG PEOPLE AND HIV

Unique Aid Foundation provides comprehensive sexuality education for adolescent and young people living with HIV in Nigeria and empowers them to demand for their rights, including access to sexual and reproductive health education and services.  While some young people had their sexual experience at age 13, the society in which they live expect them to access sexual and reproductive health services at age 18 which is the statutory age of consent for most countries in Africa, Nigeria inclusive.   This is a contradiction of reality. Let’s work towards lowering the statutory age of consent in Nigeria.  According to UNAIDS Executive Director, Michel Sidibé, “AIDS-related deaths are rising among only one population group and that is young people.